Aquatic ape hypothesis - Wikipedia

The aquatic ape hypothesis proposed that proximity to and movement in water helped drive early human evolution, including bipedalism. Though the theory has experienced both popular and scholarly interest for more than 30 years, it ultimately lacks support in the anthropological scholarly community and is not considered to be a serious contendor to explain human divergence from their most recentcommon ancestor. There are some theories proposing a weaker version of the hypothesis in which wading and sporadic aquatic feeding behaviors have exerted evolutionary pressures on human ancestors leading to bipedalism.

Alternative Evolution Theories - Aquatic Human Ancestor

The Aquatic ape hypothesis proposes that humans evolved bipedalism as a result of bipedal wading
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Alternative Evolution Theories ..

The observation that large primates, including especially the greatapes, that predominantly move quadrupedally on dry land, tend toswitch to bipedal locomotion in waist deep water, has led to the ideathat the origin of human bipedalism may have been influenced bywaterside environments. This idea, labelled "the wading hypothesis", was originally suggested by the Oxford marine biologist Alister Hardywho said: "It seems to me likely that Man learnt to stand erect firstin water and then, as his balance improved, he found he became betterequipped for standing up on the shore when he came out, and indeedalso for running." It was then promoted by Elaine Morgan , as part ofthe aquatic ape hypothesis , who cited bipedalism among a cluster ofother human traits unique among primates, including voluntary controlof breathing, hairlessness and subcutaneous fat. The "aquatic apehypothesis ", as originally formulated, has not been accepted orconsidered a serious theory within the anthropological scholarlycommunity. Others, however, have sought to promote wading as a factorin the origin of human bipedalism without referring to further("aquatic ape" related) factors. Since 2000 haspublished a series of papers and a book on a variant of the wadinghypothesis, which he calls the "amphibian generalist theory" (German :Amphibische Generalistentheorie).

of unique human features such as bipedalism

The aquatic ape hypothesis proposed that proximity to and movement in water helped drive early human evolution, including bipedalism. Though the theory has experienced both popular and scholarly interest for more than 30 years, it ultimately lacks support in the anthropological scholarly community and is not considered to be a serious contendor to explain human divergence from their most recentcommon ancestor. There are some theories proposing a weaker version of the hypothesis in which wading and sporadic aquatic feeding behaviors have exerted evolutionary pressures on human ancestors leading to bipedalism.

Niemitz's hypothesis places the wading bipedalism of hominids as occurring in the late Miocene
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The Evolution of Bipedalism | Accurate Essays

NOVA - Official Website | How Bipedalism Arose

Bipedalism evolved before our large brains ..