statistically significant association with noise exposure.

The ISO has also developed procedures for estimating hearing loss due to noise exposure. In 1971, the ISO issued the first edition of ISO 1999, [ISO 1971] (referred to as the "1971-ISO model"), which included risk estimates for material hearing impairment from occupational noise exposures. In 1990, the ISO issued a second edition of [ISO 1990] (referred to as the "1990-ISO model"). Both ISO models are based on broadband, steady noise exposures for 8-hr work shifts during a working lifetime of up to 40 years.

Dissertation date: Effects of noise exposure among navy personnel.

THESIS NOISE CHARACTERIZATION AND EXPOSURE OF File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat Sep 10, 2010  THESIS.

determine noise exposure in the agricultural setting.

Noise, which is essentially any unwanted or undesirable sound, is not a new hazard. Indeed, NIHL has been observed for centuries. Before the industrial revolution, however, comparatively few people were exposed to high levels of workplace noise. The advent of steam power in connection with the industrial revolution first brought general attention to noise as an occupational hazard. Workers who fabricated steam boilers developed hearing loss in such numbers that the malady was dubbed "boilermakers disease." Increasing mechanization in all industries and most trades has since proliferated the noise problem.

7. Moudon,A. Occupational Noise Exposure,2009,P.71

In cases where the speech signals are of paramount importance, e.g., in classrooms or conference rooms, or where listeners with impaired hearing faculties are involved, e.g., in homes for aged people, lower levels of background noise are desirable.

Perceptions ofexposure to aircraft noise as a child were associated with lower GPA scores.

(1976) Noise and the autonomic nervous system.

Despite its simplicity, the equal-energy rule is not universally accepted as a method for characterizing exposures that consist of both impulsive and continuous-type noises. Another approach favors evaluating impulsive noise separate from that of continuous-type noise. Studies that would argue for this approach will be discussed first, followed by a discussion of studies elucidating the rationale for the NIOSH position on the equal-energy rule.

(1964) The influence of noise on some circulatory functions.

Despite its simplicity, the equal-energy rule is not universally accepted as a method for characterizing exposures that consist of both impulsive and continuous-type noises. Another approach favors evaluating impulsive noise separate from that of continuous-type noise. Studies that would argue for this approach will be discussed first, followed by a discussion of studies elucidating the rationale for the NIOSH position on the equal-energy rule.

The hypothesis of this thesis is that musicians are exposed to higher noise.

Correlation between noise exposure and annoyance

The author found that by introducing a noise stimulus to a visual perception task, centrally-located visual signals were more effectively perceived, whereas peripherally-located signals tended to be ignored.

However, the findings revealed no significant impact of the noise on the children’s health.

Thus the risk of occupational noise damage is 29%.

Interference with speech communication and other sounds is one of the most salient components of noise-induced annoyance. The resulting disruption can constitute anything from an annoyance to a serious safety hazard, depending on the circumstance.

Some evidence for short-term BP adaptation to recent changes in aircraft noise exposure was found.

The noise exposure scale in Fig.

The human ear is not equally responsive to all frequencies; it is most sensitive around 4000 Hz and least sensitive in the low frequencies. The responses of the sound level meter are modified with frequency-weighting networks that represent some responses of the human ear. These empirically derived networks approximate the equal loudness-weighting networks or scales; some also have a B-scale. The A-scale, which approximates the ears response to moderate-level sounds, is commonly used in measuring noise to evaluate its effect on humans and has been incorporated in many occupational noise standards. Table 4-1 shows the characteristics of these scales.