the Spartel Bank hypothesis. Geology, 33, p.p. 685-688.

Collina-Girard's hypothesis states that during the most recentGlacial Maximum of the sea level was 135 m below itscurrent level, narrowing the Gibraltar Strait and creating a smallhalf-enclosed sea measuring 70 km by 20 km between the and . The Spartel Bank formedan archipelago in this small sea with the largest island measuringabout 10 to 12 kilometers across. With rising ocean levels theisland began to slowly shrink, but then at around 9400 BC (11,400years ago) there was an accelerated of 4meters per century known as , which drowned the top of the main island. A possiblemagnitude 9 earthquake proposed by marine geographer Marc-AndrèGutscher as occurring in this region at about this time may havecontributed to this relatively sudden disappearance by generating.

Note return to Now Cape Spartel.

A geological analysis of the Spartel Bank hypothesis, Geology 33(8), 685–688.
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A geological analysis of the Spartel Bank hypothesis.

As it was mentioned above, Gutscher's latest research work has been published by Geology in its August 2005 issue (Vol. 33, No. 8, pp. 685-688). Here is a link to of this paper named "Destruction of Atlantis by a great earthquake and tsunami? A geological analysis of the Spartel Bank hypothesis."

Spartel Bank Hypothesis – Rest in Peace

Topics include: formation of Martian outflow channels; images of a continent-ocean fracture zone utilizing 3D seismic reflection data; Pleistocene ecosystems and dining habits of several animal species; origins of the Richat dome; evidence for lateral crustal flow on Mercury; and geological analysis of the Spartel Bank hypothesis associated with the legend of Atlantis.

It was colonized by Lacedæmonians and Minyans of Lemnos, under the Spartan Theras, who gave his name to the island.
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Location hypotheses of Atlantis This article has ..

Collina-Girard's hypothesis states that during the most recent Glacial Maximum of the Ice Age sea level was 135 m below its current level, narrowing the Gibraltar Strait and creating a small half-enclosed sea measuring 70 km by 20 km between the Mediterranean and Atlantic Ocean. The Spartel Bank formed an archipelago in this small sea with the largest island measuring about 10 to 12 kilometers across. With rising ocean levels the island began to slowly shrink, but then at around 9400 BCE (11,400 years ago) there was an accelerated sea level rise of 4 meters per century known as Meltwater Pulse 1A, which drowned the top of the main island. The occurrence of a great earthquake and tsunami in this region, similar to the 1755 Lisbon earthquake (magnitude 8.5-9) was proposed by marine geophysicist Marc-Andrè Gutscher as offering a possible explanation for the described catastrophic destruction (reference — Gutscher, M.-A., 2005. Destruction of Atlantis by a great earthquake and tsunami? A geological analysis of the Spartel Bank hypothesis. Geology, v. 33, p. 685-688.) . Collina-Girard proposes that the disappearance of this island was recorded in prehistoric tradition for 5,000 years until it was written down by the first Egyptian scribes around 4000-3000 BCE, and the story then subsequently inspired to write a fictionalized version interpreted to illustrate his own principles.

Destruction of Atlantis by a great earthquake and tsunami

Two hypotheses have put Spartel Bank, a submerged former island in the Strait of Gibraltar, as the location of Atlantis. The more well-known hypothesis was proposed in a September 2001 issue of by French geologist Jacques Collina-Girard. The lesser-known hypothesis was first published by Spanish-Cuban investigator Georgeos Díaz-Montexano in an April 2000 issue of Spanish magazine (Beyond Science), and later in August 2001 issues of magazines (The Museum) and (Year Zero). The origin of Collina-Girard's hypothesis is disputed, with Díaz-Montexano claiming it as plagiarism of his own earlier hypothesis, and Collina-Girard denying any plagiarism. Both individuals claim the other's hypothesis is .

A geological analysis of the Spartel Bank hypothesis, ..

Of the many theories proposed to explain the Atlantis legend, a small submerged island (Spartel Bank) in the western Straits of Gibraltar is among the most plausible.

analysis of the Spartel Bank hypothesis."

But Kühne says Spartel Island is too small—Plato wrote that Atlantis was bigger than Libya and Asia put together—and could not have possessed the high culture described by Plato.

at the junction to Cap Spartel, ..

Prof. Luigi Sanzo, (26 Oct. - Capizzi) 1874-1940 (10 Dec. - Messina), Italian (Messina) ichthyologist, is honoured in the fish names Spartà, 1950 and (de Buen, 1918) and in the lophogastrid name (Coifman, 1937). An Italian research vessel is also honouring his name.