GoConqr - Required Practical 8: Dehydrogenase Activity

In this analysis and discussion activity, students develop their understanding of photosynthesis by answering questions about three different models of photosynthesis. These models are a chemical equation, a flowchart that shows changes in energy and matter, and a diagram that shows the basic processes in a chloroplast. Students learn about the role of scientific models by evaluating the advantages of each of these models for understanding the process of photosynthesis. (NGSS)

Photosynthesis in Action Activity - Grade 6, 7, 8

This experimental report investigates the effect of light intensity on photosynthetic activity.

Required Practical Effect of Light Intensity on Photosynthesis

In this minds-on activity, students analyze the relationships between photosynthesis, cellular respiration, and the production and use of ATP. Students learn that sugar molecules produced by photosynthesis are used for cellular respiration and for the synthesis of other organic molecules. Thus, photosynthesis contributes to plant metabolism and growth. The optional final section challenges students to explain observed changes in biomass for plants growing in the light vs. dark. (NGSS)

Published experiments | Nuffield Foundation

In the first part of this activity, students learn how to use the floating leaf disk method to measure the rate of net photosynthesis (i.e. the rate of photosynthesis minus the rate of cellular respiration). They use this method to show that net photosynthesis occurs in leaf disks in a solution of sodium bicarbonate, but not in water. Questions guide students in reviewing the relevant biology and analyzing and interpreting their results. In the second part of this activity, student groups develop hypotheses about factors that influence the rate of net photosynthesis, and then each student group designs and carries out an investigation to test the effects of one of these factors. (NGSS)


LabBench Activity Cell Respiration

In this minds-on, hands-on activity, students develop science practice skills by developing plans for a hands-on investigation, carrying out the investigation, analyzing the data, and interpreting the results. Then, students answer analysis and discussion questions as they develop a basic understanding of how taste and olfactory receptor cells function and how sensory messages to the brain contribute to flavor perception and flavor-related behavior. (NGSS)

Student Sheet 3 - Investigating Photosynthesis with …

Many of these activities are explicitly aligned with the , as indicated by (NGSS) in the descriptions below and as described in and in the Teacher Notes for individual activities. These activities foster student understanding of Disciplinary Core Ideas, engage students in Scientific Practices, provide the opportunity to discuss Crosscutting Concepts, and prepare students to meet the Performance Expectations of the Next Generation Science Standards.

Chlorophyll fluorescence - Wikipedia

Hello,
Thanks for the great resources. I didn't realize before I started to use the photosynthesis and respiration minds-on activities that these lessons were designed for classrooms with limited internet access, and I wanted to add my two-cents about that. I do have regular internet access in a computer lab or with a laptop cart, and most students now have a mobile device that they can share with others. Web activities and quests are great, but I find that with these minds-on activities (I like that term a lot), my students are more likely to read carefully, study diagrams, refer to previous lessons, and are overall more engaged than if they were using screen time to accomplish similar learning tasks. I use these activities using a POGIL style approach, and my students have a much deeper understanding of these difficult topics - and they enjoy the opportunity to work on them together. I would encourage more teachers who are concerned about students obtaining a deep understanding of biological topics to steer clear of flashier web based applications and make some of these resources work for their classrooms (thank you for publishing the resources in Word so it is easier to do this). I wish I had found them years ago!
Ben