THREE STAGES OF CELLULAR RESPIRATION

The carbon dioxide gas you exhale is the result of a completed cycle of cellular respiration.Only plants can photosynthesize, but both plants and animals depend on respiration to release the chemical potential energy originally captured through photosynthesis.The figure illustrates how closely photosynthesis and respiration are linked.

Photosynthesis vs Cellular Respiration - Difference and Com…

Between photosynthesis and cellular respiration there is what is called an inverse relationship.

Photosynthesis vs. Respiration Chart - BrainMass

The above notes describe the process of carbohydrate (glucose) catabolism for the production of ATP. When glucose is in adequate supply, such as shortly after consumption of a meal, the hormone insulin from the pancreas increases glycogen formation (glycogenesis) in the liver. When glucose levels drop between meals, the hormone glucagon is released from the pancreas and stimulates the conversion of glycogen into glucose (by the process of glycogenolysis). If all glycogen supplies are depleted, then other substances in the body are converted into glucose or intermediate products that can enter the above-outlined cellular respiration pathway. The conversion of fatty acids (from lipids) or amino acids (from proteins) into glucose or intermediate products is called gluconeogenesis (p. 500).

SC.912.L.18.9 Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration

Cellular Respiration
Cellular respiration is a series of metabolic processes which all living cells use to produce energy in the form of ATP. In cellular respiration, the cell breaks down glucose to produce large amounts of energy in the form of ATP. Cellular respiration can take two paths: aerobic respiration or anaerobic respiration. Aerobic respiration occurs when oxygen is available, whereas anaerobic respiration occurs when oxygen is not available. The two paths of cellular respiration share the glycolysis step. Aerobic respiration has three steps: glycolysis, Krebs cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation. During glycolysis, glucose is broken down into pyruvate and produces 2 ATP. The is also known as TCA cycle which contains a series of Redox reactions to convert pyruvate into CO2 and produce NADH and FADH2. During oxidative phosphorylation, NADH and FADH2 are used as substrate to generate a pH gradient on mitochondria membrane which is used to generate ATP via ATP synthase. Anaerobic respiration contains two steps: glycolysis and fermentation. Fermentation regenerates the reactants needed for glycolysis to run again. Fermentation converts pyruvate into ethanol or lactic acid, and in the process regenerates intermediates for glycolysis.


Photosynthesis And Cellular Respiration

Photosynthesis uses those products from cellular respiration as its reactants and in turn produces glucose and oxygen- the reactants needed for cellular respiration.

Photosynthesis And Cellular Respiration Quiz ..

Energy Transformation: Both Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis need to transform energy into different forms in order for their reactions to initially take place and continue onward.

materials through the processes of photosynthesis and respiration

Organisms that use cellular respiration, such as humans, use that oxygen to kick-start and propel the reactions of cellular respiration, especially those occurring during the Electron Transport Chain.

Pix For > Photosynthesis Vs Cellular Respiration Comparison

In both plants and animals, the process of — which releases stored energy for use — occurs in the mitochondria inside each cell.Chemically speaking, respiration is photosynthesis in reverse, as you can see in this equation:

C6H12O6 + 6O2 → 6H2O + 6CO2+ energy
Respiration consists of a complicated series of chemical reactions.

Compare Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration

The entire process of cellular respiration can be broken down into three separate stages: Gycolysis (meaning splitting sugars), the Citric Acid Cycle, and the Electron Transport Chain.

Chart comparing photosynthesis to respiration ..

The NAD and FAD are then reduced in the following few steps so that their reduced forms NADH and FADH2 may carry the electrons onto the next part of cellular respiration.