In which organelle does photosynthesis occur? | …

Begonia contains 1820 species and is amongst the world’s largest angiosperm genera. The genus has a pantropical distribution, characterised by extremely high rates of narrow endemism. The distribution of Begonia species richness is representative of rainforest diversity generally, being markedly greater in the Neotropics and tropical Asia, and suggests the family is a good proxy for investigating tropical diversification. Much of the research into the generation of large-scale patterns of tropical diversity has focused on trees, however herbaceous layer genera such as Begonia represent an ecologically contrasting aspect of tropical vegetation and need to be included if we are to have a complete understanding of tropical ecosystems. The prevalence of Begonia across the tropics suggests a highly successful strategy in exploiting the niches available to tropical herbs. In order to understand the generation of such a large radiation, we need insights into the interplay of niche evolution, physiology and genome evolution, building on the foundations of a sound taxonomy and robust phylogenetic hypotheses. Preliminary phylogenetic hypotheses for Begonia have been constructed, based on a small number of genome regions. Insights from next generation approaches need to be explored to show us what extent these represent species trees in the light of data on hybridisation and organelle capture. In addition we need to understand the degree of niche differentiation between species with respect to both phylogeny and genomic evolution. In this symposium we aim to bring together a variety of disciplines to give insight into the evolution of Begonia diversity, drawing on recent advances in research of niche evolution, genome dynamism, reproductive biology, photosynthetic physiology, biogeography, and management of biodiversity data. The building of a synthetic picture of evolution in the mega-diverse genus Begonia has the potential to provide a template for understanding broader patterns tropical herbaceous diversity.

Photosynthesis occurs in the organelle called the chloroplast

Name the organelle of plant cells in which photosynthesis occurs

The organelle where photosynthesis occurs

Just as were “invented,” somewhere between 1.6 bya and 600 mya a eukaryote ate a cyanobacterium and both survived, and that cyanobacterium became the ancestor of all chloroplasts, which is the photosynthetic organelle in all plants. As with similar previous events, it appears that it , and all plants are descended from that unique event. The invention of the chloroplast , which were the first plants. The first algae fossils are from about 1.2 bya. Most algae species are not called plants, as they are not descended from that instance when a eukaryote ate a cyanobacterium. The non-plant algae, such as , also have chloroplasts, from various “envelopment” events when algae chloroplasts were eaten and the grazers and chloroplasts survived. Below is the general outline of the tree of life today, in which bacteria and archaea combined to make eukaryotic cells, and in which the bacterium enveloped into a protist to make plants, and all complex life developed from protists. (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

The organelle in plants in which photosynthesis occurs is the



Let us see now how protists and other little animals of ponds react to alteration to theirenvironment.
1 - Some microscopic algae, like the euglena, search out light (phototaxis) and to do thisthey use an organelle sensible to the light, named stigma. With a dark paper, cover thebottom part of a test tube holding a culture of euglena. The part of the test tube exposedto light should become green, rich with algae. Make the same experiment with othermicroscopic algae and with protozoa.
2 - Add two or three drop of distilled water to a little water drop collected in a pondand watch what happens to the protists. Very probably you will see them inflate and thenexplode. This occurs because of the different saline concentration inside and outside theprotists and the osmotic pressure which is produced inside their cells.
3 - Protists are sensitive to most chemicals and generally they react by running away; insome cases instead they approach them (chemotaxis). Prepare some microscope slides withprotists and observe through the microscope their behavior when you add acidic substances(i.e.: vinegar), basic substances (i.e.: backing soda), glucose, salt, sparkling water(rich of CO2), broth, milk, tiny grain of cheese, dyes, etc. At thebeginning use very low amounts of these substances, then increase their concentration.
4 - From a pond or an aquarium, collect a hydra and place it on a microscope slide with apair of water drops. Observing this tiny polyp through the microscope, probably you willsee some sucker shaped microorganisms (trichodina) moving on its body. Watch what happensafter adding a little drop of vinegar to their water! Trichodina will escape from thehydra and probably die. Hydra itself will have launched many of its harmful paralyzingdarts.
5 - Submit protists to different stimulus such as light, temperature, electric field(about 5 V in DC). In this last case, some protists will gather on the cathode (thenegative - pole). Also amebas are inclined to move towards the cathode. Change thepolarity of the current and observe the behavior of the protists.
Internet Keyword: phototaxis chemotaxis protists.

Name the organelle in which photosynthesis occur?
Name the organelle plant cells in which photosynthesis occurs - 1997583

What is the organelle that photosynthesis occurs in: ..

Nov 22, 2010 · What is the organelle of plant cells where photosynthesis occurs

Photosynthesis occurs in tiny organelle called chloroplast

These genes encode proteins essential to the organelle and to photosynthesis.

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