Lithops photosynthesis | dapileticcoebarpebarporetpo

The authors here use a combination of techniques to show that individual leaves of a Lithops species have adaptations for both high light and shade tolerance, revealing for the first time the physiological mechanisms employed to optimize above-ground and subterranean photosynthesis while minimizing water loss within its extremely dry environment. Specifically, they found local differences in surface adaptations (windows) combined with regional physiological differences in the outer cell shape and chemistry and photosynthetic mechanisms, which are dependent on whether the leaf is deep underground or just above ground. This is the first time such physiological flexibility has been observed in , and offers new insight into how plants respond and adapt to extreme conditions.

Method in which lithops obtain sunlight for photosynthesis

of the plant exposed above ground in order for Lithops to complete photosynthesis
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Lithops is a genus of succulent plants in the ..

Several other large plant families have developed fleshy, succulent leaves to cope with periodic drought conditions, and they bear a superficial resemblance to cacti. These plants are called leaf succulents, rather than stem succulents. One of them is the mesembryanthemum family, and it includes the remarkable living stone plants (Lithops species) of the South African and Namibian Deserts (images below). These plants characteristically grow among pebbles on the banks of dry river beds, where they are perfectly comouflaged and where they receive periodic water when the river beds fill after rains. Each plant consists of a pair of fleshy leaves, exposed only at the surface, where the photosynthetic tissues are located beneath the patterned "windows" (see Living stones). They produce white or yellow daisy-like flowers in summer, then the old pair of leaves shrivels while the water and nutrients within them are absorbed by a new pair of leaves (or occasionally two pairs) which emerge from the gap between the old leaves.

Houseplant Care Guides: Lithops 101

Lithops are a type of South African "living stone," a mostly underground plant that lives in extremely dry conditions. This underground life makes it difficult to get enough sun to photosynthesize while still conserving as much water as possible. Lithops has many adaptations to help it do just this, including a top surface with "windows" of translucent pockets that allows light penetration to photosynthetic tissues deep within the subterranean leaf. Cleverly, these windows also have sunscreen properties to block out harmful UV light.

In common with other members of the Mesembryanthemaceae, Lithops employs a mode of photosynthesis known as Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM)
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Lithops photosynthesis – …

'Living stone' plant adapts to extreme conditions in …

are a type of South African "living stone," a mostly underground plant that lives in extremely dry conditions. This underground life makes it difficult to get enough sun to photosynthesize while still conserving as much water as possible. Lithops has many adaptations to help it do just this, including a top surface with "windows" of translucent pockets that allows light penetration to photosynthetic tissues deep within the subterranean leaf. Cleverly, these windows also have sunscreen properties to block out harmful UV light.

Lithops timelapse after watering - YouTube

Though they are plants which contain the green pigment chlorophyll used for photosynthesis, most Lithops do not appear green. The parts of the plant above ground are shades of grey, brown, and cream, some with reddish flecks, lines and other patterns. Some Lithops may be a grayish green, but none are bright green. Despite their coloring, the pigments allow light to penetrate the leaves and reach the chlorophyll deep inside the leaf essential for photosynthesis.

Lithops Living Stones Cactus Cacti Succulent Real ..