Finite Element Analysis of Stress in Bone Adjacent to Dental ..

Finite elemental analysis (FEA) is used to calculate component displacement, strain, and stress under internal and external loads in 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional (3D) computer models in various fields, including medical applications. In particular, manufacturers of dental devices use FEA to test products used in dental implantation, including the implant body, healing abutment, impression abutment, and drill kit, which are standardized during the production process. However, prosthetic appliances intended for natural teeth are not standardized because of individual differences among patients. Therefore, FEA is better suited for implant assessment; consequently, many studies have reported the standardization of dental implants by FEA [1] -[10] .

Finite-Element Analysis of Stress on Dental Implant Prosthesis

Three-dimensional finite element models of dental prosthesis were constructed.

Application of Finite Element Analysis in Implant Dentistry

The numerical analysis was carried out using the software Straus7 of G + D Computing. The entire system was meshed by 300147 tetrahedral elements (or bricks) and 56721 nodes (). The mesh adopted was more dense at the bone-implant interface. In particular, the average size of the elements at the bone-implant interface was 0.5 mm, while 1 mm in the remaining regions. The discrete solution in terms of displacements was constrained to satisfy conditions of continuity in each interface between adjacent regions, as well as the three degrees of freedom for each node located at the end of the mandibular section were suppressed. This assumption, since the remaining part of the jaw does not offer a completely rigid support to the mandibular segment selected, was acceptable for comparative claims of the present study. A further non-linear dynamic analysis was carried out, considering the most critical scenario among obtained results, increasing the loads and disabling the cement bricks that showed compressive or tensile failure. Many 45° load (H=V) steps were considered: 30N, 60N, 120N, 240N, 500N, 600N, 800N. The compressive and tensile strength of each element were 327.8 MPa and 1 MPa respectively (). Thus, for each load step, stress state at bone-implant interface was evaluated.

Nonlinear finite element contact analysis of dental implant ..

The aim of this work was to evaluate, by means finite element analysis, the stress distribution at the bone - implant interface: at first, a linear static analysis was conducted, varying prosthetic materials and load patterns; then, a non-linear dynamic analysis was conducted, considering the most critical scenario among previous results, to assess the influence of the gradual crisis of the cement layer, subjected to increasing loads, on the stress state at the bone-implant interface.

Applications of finite element analysis in implant dentistry, a review of literatures.
Evaluation of design parameters of osseointegrated dental implants using finite element analysis.

Bicon Dental Implants | Literature and Publications

Due to the sophisticated geometry and the involved phenomena, numerical solutions are a proper tool to analyze both the evolution of bone remodelling (), and to evaluate the stress distribution in the perimplant tissues as a result of occlusal loads transferred by the implant. Therefore, the finite element method is a powerful numerical tool that allows to parametrically investigate the influence of the implant and the prosthesis designs, loading intensity and direction, bone and prosthesis mechanical properties, and to simulate various clinical scenarios ().

Influence of fine threads and platform-switching on crestal bone stress around implant-a three dimensional finite element analysis.

Peri-implantitis and Management | DGOI

AB - Purpose: This article describes the development of a model system for use in finite element stress analysis of three different IMZ abutment designs: original threaded Intra-Mobile Element (IME), Abutment Complete (ABC), and Intra-Mobile Connector (IMC). Materials and Methods: A three-dimensional model simulating a cast gold crown restoration attached to an osseointegrated IMZ implant fixture was generated for each abutment design. Each model was discretized into axisymmetric finite elements representing the crown, the various implant system components, and supporting structures. A convergence test was performed to optimize the mesh. Convergence test mesh refinement for the IME, the IMC, and the ABC abutment models resulted in 818 elements, 2,566 nodes; 738 elements, 2,362 nodes; and 663 elements, 2,051 nodes, respectively. Progressive tightening of the retaining screw (preload) was simulated; the degree of screw tightening necessary to prevent opening of the crown-abutment interface in extreme loading (500-N occlusal load at 45°) was determined individually for each system. Conclusions: Models of three IMZ abutment designs have been refined and the appropriate relative screw preloads determined. This model system is to be used subsequently in stress analysis comparison for the three systems.

Finite element analysis of effect of prosthesis height, angle of force application, and implant offset on supporting bone.

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N2 - Purpose: This article describes the development of a model system for use in finite element stress analysis of three different IMZ abutment designs: original threaded Intra-Mobile Element (IME), Abutment Complete (ABC), and Intra-Mobile Connector (IMC). Materials and Methods: A three-dimensional model simulating a cast gold crown restoration attached to an osseointegrated IMZ implant fixture was generated for each abutment design. Each model was discretized into axisymmetric finite elements representing the crown, the various implant system components, and supporting structures. A convergence test was performed to optimize the mesh. Convergence test mesh refinement for the IME, the IMC, and the ABC abutment models resulted in 818 elements, 2,566 nodes; 738 elements, 2,362 nodes; and 663 elements, 2,051 nodes, respectively. Progressive tightening of the retaining screw (preload) was simulated; the degree of screw tightening necessary to prevent opening of the crown-abutment interface in extreme loading (500-N occlusal load at 45°) was determined individually for each system. Conclusions: Models of three IMZ abutment designs have been refined and the appropriate relative screw preloads determined. This model system is to be used subsequently in stress analysis comparison for the three systems.