adds a new block to the current fault tree.

ReliaSoft offers a three-day training course that addresses the topic of system reliability, maintainability and related analyses using a reliability block diagram (RBD) or fault tree analysis (FTA) approach. By combining a solid theoretical foundation with practical application examples and hands-on training on the use of the BlockSim software tool, this course will give you the knowledge and skills you will need to successfully apply these important reliability techniques.

add a new to the current fault tree.

 add a new  to the current fault tree.

Building fault trees, including:

Figure 5 presents this configuration in a reliability block diagram, created in BlockSim from the fault tree. This diagram also requires the use of more than one block in the diagram to represent the same component and uses mirror blocks to achieve this.

add a new to the current fault tree.

In addition, you can use a combination of fault trees and RBDs in an analysis. For example, you can use fault trees as subdiagrams in an RBD, and vice versa.

A visual guide to the  in fault trees.

Table 2: Classic Fault Tree Event Symbols and their RBD Equivalents

In BlockSim, you can choose to create a reliability block diagram that is equivalent to the current fault tree. In addition, you can you can create hybrid analyses by linking fault trees as subdiagrams to RBDs and vice versa.

Figure 6: Fault Tree Diagram of Mode B

The increasing complexity and scale of ship machinery systems pose significant challenges to failure analysis. There is a tendency to optimize systems via the introduction of new technologies in order to achieve, for example, improved energy efficiency or expand the operation area to extreme environments. Although such improvements are welcome, they typically also cause significant design changes that need to be supported by dedicated reliability and availability analysis. Recently, substantial work towards addressing these challenges has resulted in semi-automatic approaches to the synthesis of system failure prediction models, such as fault trees. This paper presents, with the help of application examples, the experience gained from the use of the semi-automatic fault tree synthesis method and tool "Hierarchically Performed Hazard Origin & Propagation Studies" (HiP-HOPS) together with the simulation platform SimulationX. Beyond the automation and simplification of reliability and availability prediction, a further benefit of the approach presented in the paper is the use of the same system model for the dual purpose of behavioural simulation and reliability analysis. This enables a fast and efficient consideration of design modifications avoiding the need of updating simulation and reliability models separately, and therefore facilitating an easy iteration of the design process and useful model-based interpretation of analyses by designers, operators or approval authorities even in complex systems.

adds a new  block to the current fault tree.

adds a new to the current fault tree.


The most fundamental difference between FTDs and RBDs is that you work in the "success space" in an RBD while you work in the "failure space" in a fault tree. In other words, the RBD looks at success combinations while the fault tree looks at failure combinations. In addition, fault trees have traditionally been used to analyze fixed probabilities (i.e., each event that comprises the tree has a fixed probability of occurring) while RBDs may include time-dependent distributions for the success (reliability equation) and other properties, such as repair/restoration distributions. In general (and with some specific exceptions), a fault tree can be easily converted to an RBD. However, it is generally more difficult to convert an RBD into a fault tree, especially if one allows for highly complex configurations.

adds a  block to the current fault tree.

adds an block to the current fault tree

Although the symbols and structures of the two diagram types differ, most of the logical constructions in a fault tree diagram can also be modeled with an RBD. In general, a fault tree can be easily converted to an RBD. It is generally more difficult to convert an RBD into a fault tree, especially if one allows for highly complex configurations.

adds a  block to the current fault tree

adds a block to the current fault tree

allows you to select a new event block to add to the current fault tree. When adding blocks to a fault tree, they will automatically be connected to the currently selected block, if any. For all events, you set the event properties in the .