Ourhypothesis, that the coin is biased toward heads, is directional.

Now instead of testing 1000 plant extracts, imagine that you are testing just one. If you are testing it to see if it kills beetle larvae, you know (based on everything you know about plant and beetle biology) there's a pretty good chance it will work, so you can be pretty sure that a P value less than 0.05 is a true positive. But if you are testing that one plant extract to see if it grows hair, which you know is very unlikely (based on everything you know about plants and hair), a P value less than 0.05 is almost certainly a false positive. In other words, if you expect that the null hypothesis is probably true, a statistically significant result is probably a false positive. This is sad; the most exciting, amazing, unexpected results in your experiments are probably just your data trying to make you jump to ridiculous conclusions. You should require a much lower P value to reject a null hypothesis that you think is probably true.

What are some examples of directional hypotheses? - …

A directional and causal hypothesis is the most specific of those discussed so far.

DIRECTIONAL HYPOTHESIS - Psychology Dictionary

However, it is not possible to come up with an example for each cell of these matrices because it is not possible to propose a non-directional and causal hypothesis.

Hypotheses; directional and non-directional – …

This is why, for example, we can be more confident of research results that are consistent with a causal-directional hypothesis, than is the case of findings that are consistent with a non-directional hypothesis.


Z-8: Two-Sample and Directional Hypothesis Testing - …

Non-directional tests are called "two-tailed" tests because we must include the possibility that the alternative population could be less than or greater than

Directional Hypothesis - Direction Net Worth

If the conclusion were to support the claim that the antibiotic prolonged group A life spans, then the researchers should use a directional alternate hypothesis, such as Ha: XbarA > XbarB. Here group A's life span is hypothesized to be greater (longer) than group B's (the control group). In this case, an alpha level of 0.05 implies that all 0.05 would have to appear in the right or high tail of the curve, which then is a one-tailed or directional test, as shown in Figure 8-3. This figure shows that the critical t-value will actually be smaller for the one-tail test, that is, +1.65 instead of 1.96 or 2.00 from the two-tail test. This happens because 95% of the area under the curve begins to accumulate from the left-most side of the curve (including that tail) and includes less of the right side of the curve. The result is that tcalc can be smaller (1.65 instead of 1.96) and still cause Ho to be rejected.

ERIC - Directional and Non-directional Hypothesis …

To reiterate, if you are standing right at the gate (1.96) for a two-tail test, then you have just barely met the p=0.05 requirement. However, if you are standing at the 1.96 point when running a one-tail test, then you have already exceeded the 1.65 gate and the probability must be even more significant, say p=0.025. It's important to find the critical t-value that is correct for the intended directional nature of the test.

Directional and Non-Directional Hypotheses - BrainMass

Remember the example of testing the effect of antibiotics on mice in Lesson 7. The point of the study was to find out if the mice who were treated with the antibiotic would outlive those who were not treated (i.e., the control group). Are you surprised that the researcher did not hypothesize that the control group might outlive the treatment group? Would it make any difference in how the hypothesis testing were carried out? These questions raise the issue of directional testing, or one-tailed vs two-tailed tests.

Hypotheses can either be directional or non-directional

A directional hypothesis is more specific, in that the experimenter predicts, not only that a specific relationship will exist, but, further, the direction of that relationship.

Directional vs Nondirectional Tests - YouTube

Now don't get confused - we're not testing to see if our mice have two tails! We're testing to see if the mean of the sample group is either less than or greater than the mean of the control group, which - in statistical terms - is considered to be a two-direction or two-tailed test. Remember that the hypotheses were Ho:XbarA = XbarB and Ha: XbarA is not equal to XbarB. In this alternate hypothesis, all that has been said is that the two means are not the same, which would be true (a) if the mean of the sample group is higher than that of the control group or (b) if the mean of the sample group is lower than that of the control group. There is nothing in the phrasing of the hypothesis that stipulates the group A animals (treated) must actually have longer life spans as compared to the group B animals.