Australian Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis …

We detail the contribution, role and value of synthesis using ACEAS to exemplify the capacity for synthesis centres to facilitate trans-organisational, transdisciplinary synthesis. We compare ACEAS to other international synthesis centres, and describe how it facilitated project teams and its objective of linking natural resource science to policy to management. Scientists and managers were brought together to actively collaborate in multi-institutional, cross-sectoral and transdisciplinary research on contemporary ecological problems. The teams analysed, integrated and synthesised existing data to co-develop solution-oriented publications and management recommendations that might otherwise not have been produced. We identify key outcomes of some ACEAS working groups which used synthesis to tackle important ecosystem challenges. We also examine the barriers and enablers to synthesis, so that risks can be minimised and successful outcomes maximised. We argue that synthesis centres have a crucial role in developing, communicating and using synthetic transdisciplinary research.

The Australian Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis

The Australian Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (ACEAS) ..

The Australian Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis ..

The Australian Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (ACEAS) publishes synthesised data products produced by the ACEAS sponsored working groups and workshops. Many of these datasets are available as map-based visualisations and are downloadable from the along with related information.

Australian Centre for Ecological Analysis ..

The Eco-Informatics Facility has developed the Australian Ecological Knowledge and Observation System () to store rich contextual ecological data and is accessed via a sophisticated online . The Portal enables browsing, searching, viewing and retrieval of many different types of ecological data systematically collected at the sampling unit level (plot, quadrat, transect, trapping array, tissue sample). Datasets can be referenced in ÆKOS with a metadata description only, or a metadata description with an attached opaque file such as an Excel spreadsheet, or the data within a significant dataset can be fully integrated and federated, with contextual information describing the data added so that researchers can assess its fitness for purpose and reuse. Fully ingested and integrated data is accessible at the sampling unit level (e.g., number per quadrat) and this enables selected records from many datasets to be combined and downloaded via a shopping cart. Data are free and openly accessible under Creative Commons licences. Some data (

of the Australian Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis.

Centre for the synthesis and analysis of biodiversity

With growing international calls for the enhanced involvement of Indigenous peoples and their biocultural knowledge in managing conservation and the sustainable use of physical environment, it is timely to review the available literature and develop cross-cultural approaches to the management of biocultural resources. Online spatial databases are becoming common tools for educating land managers about Indigenous Biocultural Knowledge (IBK), specifically to raise a broad awareness of issues, identify knowledge gaps and opportunities, and to promote collaboration. Here we describe a novel approach to the application of internet and spatial analysis tools that provide an overview of publically available documented Australian IBK (AIBK) and outline the processes used to develop the online resource. By funding an AIBK working group, the Australian Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (ACEAS) provided a unique opportunity to bring together cross-cultural, cross-disciplinary and trans-organizational contributors who developed these resources. Without such an intentionally collaborative process, this unique tool would not have been developed. The tool developed through this process is derived from a spatial and temporal literature review, case studies and a compilation of methods, as well as other relevant AIBK papers. The online resource illustrates the depth and breadth of documented IBK and identifies opportunities for further work, partnerships and investment for the benefit of not only Indigenous Australians, but all Australians. The database currently includes links to over 1500 publically available IBK documents, of which 568 are geo-referenced and were mapped. It is anticipated that as awareness of the online resource grows, more documents will be provided through the website to build the database. It is envisaged that this will become a well-used tool, integral to future natural and cultural resource management and maintenance.

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With growing international calls for the enhanced involvement of Indigenous peoples and their biocultural knowledge in managing conservation and the sustainable use of physical environment, it is timely to review the available literature and develop cross-cultural approaches to the management of biocultural resources. Online spatial databases are becoming common tools for educating land managers about Indigenous Biocultural Knowledge (IBK), specifically to raise a broad awareness of issues, identify knowledge gaps and opportunities, and to promote collaboration. Here we describe a novel approach to the application of internet and spatial analysis tools that provide an overview of publically available documented Australian IBK (AIBK) and outline the processes used to develop the online resource. By funding an AIBK working group, the Australian Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (ACEAS) provided a unique opportunity to bring together cross-cultural, cross-disciplinary and trans-organizational contributors who developed these resources. Without such an intentionally collaborative process, this unique tool would not have been developed. The tool developed through this process is derived from a spatial and temporal literature review, case studies and a compilation of methods, as well as other relevant AIBK papers. The online resource illustrates the depth and breadth of documented IBK and identifies opportunities for further work, partnerships and investment for the benefit of not only Indigenous Australians, but all Australians. The database currently includes links to over 1500 publically available IBK documents, of which 568 are geo-referenced and were mapped. It is anticipated that as awareness of the online resource grows, more documents will be provided through the website to build the database. It is envisaged that this will become a well-used tool, integral to future natural and cultural resource management and maintenance.

Data Management Challenges in Analysis and Synthesis …

These skills span many disciplines
and require trans-disciplinary collaboration.
Science synthesis centres support analysis and synthesis through collaborative ‘Working Groups’ where domain specialists work together to synthesise existing information to provide insight into critical problems.