Figure C shows an example of an Walldius hinge total knee prosthesis

Our staff at Orthpaedic Associates of St. Augustine’s Foot & Ankle Center specializes in treating foot and ankle injuries in the St. Augustine, St. Johns, and surrounding areas. Our foot and ankle doctors include board certified and fellowship trained orthopaedic surgeon Kurtis Hort, MD, board certified orthopaedic surgeon Sina Kasraeian, MD, and board certified podiatric […]

Total Joint Replacement - OrthoInfo - AAOS

This article is an introduction to total joint replacement surgery

Ankle Replacement Rapidly on the Rise - ACFAS

Contraindications: The physician’s education, training and professional judgement must be relied upon to choose the most appropriate device and treatment. Conditions presenting an increased risk of failure include: any active or suspected latent infection or marked local inflammation in or about the affected area. Compromised vascularity that would inhibit adequate blood supply to the fracture or the operative site. Bone stock compromised by disease, infection or prior implantation that can not provide adequate support and/or fixation of the devices. Material sensitivity, documented or suspected. Obesity. An overweight or obese patient can produce loads on the implant that can lead to failure of the fixation of the device or to failure of the device itself. Patients having inadequate tissue coverage over the operative site. Implant utilization that would interfere with anatomical structures or physiological performance. Any mental or neuromuscular disorder which would create an unacceptable risk of fixation failure or complications in postoperative care. Other medical or surgical conditions which would preclude the potential benefit of surgery. The T2 Ankle Arthrodesis Nail should NOT be used if following conditions are present: tibial malalignment of > 10˚ in any plane, severe vascular deficiency, osteomyelitis or soft tissue infection.

Ankle Replacement Rapidly on the Rise 2012 03 02 SAN ANTONIO, TX

Common Side Effects from Total Ankle Replacement Surgery: For the first two weeks after surgery it is normal to have a moderate amount of pain. You may need to use pain medicine(s). This pain may slowly decrease over time, but it is not unusual to experience some discomfort for up to three months and swelling may continue for up to a year after surgery. Contact your surgeon right away if at any time you notice: Fluid leaking from your wound, Redness around your wound, Pain or swelling that starts suddenly (especially after an ankle twist or fall) or Severe pain after the initial two weeks following your surgery.

Learn more about ankle replacement surgery including procedure information, lifestyle impact and products from DePuy that may greatly improve your rehabilitation.
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Stryker Orthopaedics | Joint Pain | Stryker

Orthopedic surgery - All medical device manufacturers …

What is ankle replacement surgery